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'Learning About Crime-The JapaneseSocial Exclusion Exnerience" bv David H.Bavley, in The In Crime Control public ~nterest(Summer 1976), 10 E.
53rd St., New York, N.Y. 10022.
In affluent, urbanized Japan, the crime rate has declined to a 25-year low, and the downward trend continues. Comparable statistics indicate there are four times as many serious crimes per capita in the United States as there are crimes (of any sort) in Japan. Even drug-related crimes, once a serious Japanese problem,...

Benigno E. Aguirre, in
Latin American Research Review (no. 1, 1976), 316 Hamilton Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514.
Between 1959 and 1972, the United States received almost half a million Cuban immigrants-almost all of them white. In this study, Aguirre, doctoral candidate in sociology at Ohio University, assays the political and social forces that have discouraged emigration of blacks, who comprise over a quarter of Cuba's population but in 1970 made up only 2.6 percent...

Everett Faculty Women: C. Ladd, Jr. and Seymour Martin Lipsit, A Political Profile in The Chronicle of Higher Education
(May 10, 1976), 1717 Massachusetts Ave.,
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Since 1970, there has been a steady increase in the proportion of women on American college faculties; now 37 percent of the teachers under 30 are female. Women teaching the social sciences tend to be more "radical"; but otherwise "men and women [teachers] differ little in their general social...

Everett Faculty Women: C. Ladd, Jr. and Seymour Martin Lipsit, A Political Profile in The Chronicle of Higher Education
(May 10, 1976), 1717 Massachusetts Ave.,
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Since 1970, there has been a steady increase in the proportion of women on American college faculties; now 37 percent of the teachers under 30 are female. Women teaching the social sciences tend to be more "radical"; but otherwise "men and women [teachers] differ little in their general social...

permitting development in a more "mature" environment. The only child suffers from the lack of opportunity to teach younger siblings-a handicap affecting last-born children, too.
Thus, some of the decline in SAT scores may be attributed to a steady fall in the percentage of first children born between 1947 and 1962 (from 42 percent to 27 percent), resulting in fewer children taking the SAT who have the intellectual advantages of being firstborn. The proportion of first children has been...

Thomas E. Patterson and Rob- Elections ert D. McClure, in Psychology Today (July1976), P.O. Box 2990, Boulder, Colo. 80302.
Patterson and McClure puncture some fashionable assumptions about television's influence in American elections. The authors, both political scientists at Syracuse University, analyzed every televised political commercial and network weekday evening newscast during the 1972 Nixon-McGovern contest. They also interviewed more than 600 voters -at the start, midway, and end of...

Thomas E. Patterson and Rob- Elections ert D. McClure, in Psychology Today (July1976), P.O. Box 2990, Boulder, Colo. 80302.
Patterson and McClure puncture some fashionable assumptions about television's influence in American elections. The authors, both political scientists at Syracuse University, analyzed every televised political commercial and network weekday evening newscast during the 1972 Nixon-McGovern contest. They also interviewed more than 600 voters -at the start, midway, and end of...

Mary Ellen Leary,
IS Good News? in Columbia Journalism Review (July-Aug. 1976), 601 Journalism Bldg., Colum- bia University, New York, N.Y. 10027.
California television stations virtually ignored the 1974 gubernatorial contest between Democrat Edmund G. Brown, Jr. and his underdog Republican challenger, Houston Flournoy. Political reporter Leary dis- closes that six major television stations in four principal metropolitan areas of California devoted just 2 percent (6 out of 257 hours) of their...

Robert S. Erikson, in
Of Endorsements American Journal of Political Science
(May 1976), 5980 Cass Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48202.
Can the mass media, endorsing a particular candidate, persuade a significant number of voters to switch their votes? Florida State Uni- versity political scientist Erikson studies the 1964 presidential election and answers yes, in limited situations. In 1964, traditionally Republi- can newspapers endorsed Democratic nominee Lyndon Johnson, over his GOP rival, Senator Barry...

Ludendorff as part of a defensive doctrine for trench warfare. Crediting Hutier with all this was the work of Allied print media, beginning with the French, who, Alfoldi suggests, needed an enemy "genius" to explain a shocking setback and preferred one with a French name and Huguenot ancestors.

ARTS & LETTERS
A Good Theater "Toward an Architecture of the Theater as a Human Art" Martin Bloom, in Is Hard to Find the AIA Journal (June 1976), 1735 New York Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C...

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