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The ancient inhabitants of England, who built Stonehenge, had geography on their side. (Mari / Flickr)
In Essence

Geography and history stack the deck against poor countries.

Despite great progress, malaria still kills almost 1,500 children every day in sub-Saharan Africa. Many deaths could be prevented by mosquito nets like the one protecting Siama Marjan in Nairobi, Kenya, but the $5 cost is more than many Africans can easily afford. (Newscom)
In Essence

Helping the poor save could be as simple as handing families safe boxes.

Protestors in Brazil face off against police. (Fernando H. C. Oliveira / Flickr)
In Essence

Voters say they prefer clean politicians even if they’re incompetent. Why don’t they vote that way?

Nature vs nature? Take a look at your ballot. (Duncan Hull / Flickr)

Ideologues on both sides pick and choose from genetic science to support their views.

When an eloquent Anglican clergyman gave the first prayer at the First Continental Congress in 1774, one member wrote that “even Quakers shed tears.” But the Founders were a religiously diverse lot, and some honored conventional religion more in public than in private. (Granger Archive)
In Essence

Even for nonbelievers, religion has its uses.

British and Gurkha troops attack Afghan troops in this painting of the Battle of Kandahar, which ended the Second Anglo-Afghan War.

To convince the world you’ve prevailed in battle, sometimes you have to get creative.

A former child soldier that had been abducted by the Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda. (Liz St. Jean Photography)
In Essence

Many unwilling soldiers bond with their new comrades through ugly means.

Everyone celebrates their country in a different way--here, some U.S. sailors practice unfurling a flag before a baseball game. (U.S. Navy)
In Essence

An ancient force is back, and it’s causing trouble worldwide.

A female soldier in the Israeli Defense Force, where many women already serve in combat roles. (IDF)
In Essence

Women won’t just succeed in combat roles, they’ll excel.

Would you give this man a nuclear weapon? Even the closest allies of Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah would have good reason not to trust such a terrorist with so much power. (Newscom)
In Essence

Even the most evil regime would not hand nukes over to terrorists.

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